Business & Microfinance Internships Abroad: Get Hands-On Experience

2018-10-09T07:43:12+00:00By |
By Robin Van Auken on Volunteer Forever

With the semester winding down, you probably have some free time on the horizon. You could go home and see if your job at the local grocery store is still open…or if you’re looking for an adventure, you can choose a totally different path and sign up for a business internship abroad.

There are so many internship opportunities around the world for students who want to gain hands-on experience and a leg up in their career. Travel to China and work with an export company in a Shanghai skyscraper. Or develop business plans for female entrepreneurs in a coastal fishing village in Ghana. If you’re interested in Latin American culture, cruise to Costa Rica and improve your Spanish-speaking skills with a micro business there.

INVEST IN YOURSELF WHEN YOU INVEST IN OTHERS

Internships are an investment in your future. If you’re a business major, then you already know that investments are a good thing. But maybe you need a few more reasons to consider an internship abroad. While they don’t always pay in cash, they can be valuable in many other ways. Internships allow you to:

  1. Gain New Skills: Be intentional about working toward your career goals and spend time developing and refining skills in your desired field.
  2. Learn About an Industry: You’ll gain insight into the inner workings of an industry and learn a new occupation. This is a great way to learn about your career choice and prepare you for your future.
  3. Strengthen Your Resume: Employers are looking for experience on your resume – yes, even as a recent college graduate – and an internship can demonstrate your knowledge, skills, and abilities, as well as your confidence as an international traveler and your ability to work with as part of a team.
  4. Find and Connect with Mentors: You may find a wonderful mentor on your internship and this person’s influence can guide you for the rest of your life. Take the time to get to know everyone in the office and seek guidance.
  5. Become More Professional: For many students, an internship can be their first introduction to an industry or career. You can learn a lot from the people you meet and work with, including how to behave professionally. You’ll have a better idea of how to interact with colleagues, vendors, and clients after you’re internship and conduct yourself with maturity and confidence.
  6. Receive Recommendations: If you’re hardworking, punctual, and committed during your internship, then you’ve left a favorable impression on your supervisor and your coworkers. Politely ask for recommendations and then maintain a relationship with them once the program has ended.
  7. Know What You Want: You’ll know if you like your chosen sector – or if you don’t – when you finish your internship.

If you’re considering an internship but you’re not sure where you want to go or what you want to do, take a look at the programs we’ve featured below. There are many more opportunities with each of these trusted organizations, and these recommendations can get you started on your internship research.

READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE BY ROBIN VAN AUKEN ON VOLUNTEER FOREVER…

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About the Author:

Robin Van Auken, CEO of Hands on Heritage, is a writer and researcher, with 35+ years experience interviewing people and telling stories. Her educational background combines advanced degrees in Communications and Anthropology, with a focus on Public and Historical (Military/Industrial Sites) Archaeology. In addition to her work as a journalist, she is the author and co-author of a dozen books on regional history. An adjunct college instructor, she has directed multi-year historical and archaeological projects, working with hundreds of volunteers and temporary staff, and educating thousands of visitors.