Spanish Immersion Programs: Learn Spanish Abroad, Earn College Credit

2018-10-09T07:44:23+00:00By |
By Robin Van Auken on Volunteer Forever

Immerse yourself in a Spanish Language program abroad and earn college credit. Foreign language courses are required for most university degrees, and being conversational or even fluent in another language can improve your career prospects. Being bilingual can help you stand out in a competitive job market.

Need another good reason to learn Spanish?

Consider that only English, Mandarin, and Hindi have more speakers than Spanish, and it’s an official language on four different continents.

The Pew Research Center predicts that the United States will become the biggest Spanish-speaking country in the world. Currently, an estimated 37.6 million people in the United States speak Spanish, and the Latino population will soar to 128.8 million by 2060.

Other benefits include the ability to work abroad, and be independent while traveling. As an adult, you’ll also be exercising your brain. And some fun benefits include understanding Spanish song lyrics, keeping the captions turned off when bingeing telenovelas, and best of all, making new friends!

Let’s take a look at a few different opportunities available for you to travel abroad and learn Spanish!

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About the Author:

Robin Van Auken, CEO of Hands on Heritage, is a writer and researcher, with 35+ years experience interviewing people and telling stories. Her educational background combines advanced degrees in Communications and Anthropology, with a focus on Public and Historical (Military/Industrial Sites) Archaeology. In addition to her work as a journalist, she is the author and co-author of a dozen books on regional history. An adjunct college instructor, she has directed multi-year historical and archaeological projects, working with hundreds of volunteers and temporary staff, and educating thousands of visitors.